Not that kind of merc.  I'm talking about the cars.  Have you ever wondered about all the beat up, vintage Mercedes crowding the streets of the Middle East?  Growing up in North America, you never saw Mercs from the 50s, 60s or 70s.  What's more, when you did see them, they were luxury cars, not dinged up taxi cabs. So what gives?

Not that kind of merc.  I'm talking about the cars.  Have you ever wondered about all the beat up, vintage Mercedes crowding the streets of the Middle East?  Growing up in North America, you never saw Mercs from the 50s, 60s or 70s.  What's more, when you did see them, they were luxury cars, not dinged up taxi cabs. So what gives?

 On a flight a while back, I sat next to an Austrian gentleman who explained it to me.  After WW2, Germany was rebuilding its auto industry and Mercedes, like all major corporations, began looking abroad for export markets.  North America was a non-starter due to residual bad blood from the war but there were no such obstacles in the Middle East.  So, that's where they focused their efforts.  Kind of obvious when you think about it.

On a flight a while back, I sat next to an Austrian gentleman who explained it to me.  After WW2, Germany was rebuilding its auto industry and Mercedes, like all major corporations, began looking abroad for export markets.  North America was a non-starter due to residual bad blood from the war but there were no such obstacles in the Middle East.  So, that's where they focused their efforts.  Kind of obvious when you think about it.

beruit_003_b copy.jpg
beruit_004 copy.jpg
beruit_005_a copy.jpg
beruit_006_a copy.jpg
beruit_007_a copy.jpg
beruit_008_a copy.jpg
beruit_009_a copy.jpg
 Not that kind of merc.  I'm talking about the cars.  Have you ever wondered about all the beat up, vintage Mercedes crowding the streets of the Middle East?  Growing up in North America, you never saw Mercs from the 50s, 60s or 70s.  What's more, when you did see them, they were luxury cars, not dinged up taxi cabs. So what gives?
 On a flight a while back, I sat next to an Austrian gentleman who explained it to me.  After WW2, Germany was rebuilding its auto industry and Mercedes, like all major corporations, began looking abroad for export markets.  North America was a non-starter due to residual bad blood from the war but there were no such obstacles in the Middle East.  So, that's where they focused their efforts.  Kind of obvious when you think about it.
beruit_003_b copy.jpg
beruit_004 copy.jpg
beruit_005_a copy.jpg
beruit_006_a copy.jpg
beruit_007_a copy.jpg
beruit_008_a copy.jpg
beruit_009_a copy.jpg

Not that kind of merc.  I'm talking about the cars.  Have you ever wondered about all the beat up, vintage Mercedes crowding the streets of the Middle East?  Growing up in North America, you never saw Mercs from the 50s, 60s or 70s.  What's more, when you did see them, they were luxury cars, not dinged up taxi cabs. So what gives?

On a flight a while back, I sat next to an Austrian gentleman who explained it to me.  After WW2, Germany was rebuilding its auto industry and Mercedes, like all major corporations, began looking abroad for export markets.  North America was a non-starter due to residual bad blood from the war but there were no such obstacles in the Middle East.  So, that's where they focused their efforts.  Kind of obvious when you think about it.

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